What life stage are you in?

Your needs change throughout your life. Use this tool to help you select the benefit plans that work with what’s going on in your life right now. Remember at every stage of your life to take advantage of contributing to the First Data Corporation Incentive Savings Plan (ISP), your 401(k), and also receive the added benefit of Company matching contributions.

This is an exciting time in your life. You might be healthy, but you never know what could happen in the future. It’s smart to be prepared for the “what ifs” in life.

Things to consider...

  • Think through medical, dental and vision benefits – You might be healthy, but you still need a safety net in case something happens. You need some level of coverage to protect you financially if you incur unexpected medical expenses. To keep you healthy for the long term, our medical and dental plans cover preventive care at 100%. If you wear contact lenses or glasses, check out the vision plan benefits.
  • Save by using the Health Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) – With the Health Care FSA, you can pay for certain expenses—such as doctor’s office copays, prescription drugs, physician-prescribed over-the-counter drugs and more. Since your contributions come out of your pay before any taxes are calculated, you are saving money on your taxes. That gives you more money in your pocket for other things!
  • Consider voluntary long-term disability coverage – Sometime during your working career you might be unable to work due to an accident or injury. If you don’t feel you can live on 50% of your income, consider increasing your disability benefit to 66-2/3% of your income. You will automatically be assigned 66 2/3% during enrollment so you must opt out if you are comfortable with 50%.You are more likely to use your disability benefit than your life insurance benefit, so it may be worth the extra cost.
  • Go back to school with tuition reimbursement – It might be the perfect time to start that undergraduate degree or take graduate school classes before too much of life—like having a family—gets in the way.   Once eligible (after one year of employement), First Data will reimburse you for eligible tuition costs.
  • Save money with the discount program – No need to pay full price for cells phones and service, electronics,fine dining and more.
  • Health Advocate – If you are reviewing your benefits and need some clarification on your medical or dental plans, Health Advocate can help by assigning you a Personal Health Advocate to answer your questions.
  • Secure your future – Take advantage of First Data Wellness initiatives to help offset the cost of your medical premiums and help you live a healthier lifestyle. SimplyWell can help you achieve your health goals. 

Congratulations are in order. When you're getting married, there are many new considerations to discuss with your spouse to be. You're not just merging households; it's important to coordinate your benefits as well.

Things to consider...

  • Compare benefit plans - If your spouse/domestic partner is eligible for medical coverage through his/her employer, medical coverage will not be available through First Data. However, be sure to evaluate First Data plans with your spouse's benefit options. Compare payroll deductions, plan designs, deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums to determine which plan is best for you as a family. A tool you may find helpful in your review process is the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), which provides an apples to apples comparison of any medical plan. Your spouse's employer can provide an SBC for any medical plan you wish to review.
  • Need to make changes to your medical, dental and/or vision plans - If you are changing any of your coverage (adding your spouse to your health coverage or cancelling your coverage to enroll in your spouses), be sure to complete the transaction through Your Benefits Resources within 31 days of your marriage. Otherwise, you'll need to wait until the next annual enrollment period.See qualified family status change. If enrolling in a First Data medical plan, be sure and evaluate your contributions to the Health Savings Account (HSA). You can use your account to pay out-of-pocket expenses such as deductibles, coinsurance and pharmacy copays. You may also let your account grow and use it for future expenses, including those in retirement. Your contributions are deducted from your paycheck before taxes on a per pay period basis, saving you on taxes.
  • Evaluate your life insurance needs for both you and your spouse - What level of protection would be appropriate to cover your ongoing expenses if there was a loss.
  • Update your life insurance beneficiary - No one likes to think about it, but it's important to protect your spouse's financial security, just in case. Go to Your Benefits Resources and click on Topics and then Beneficiaries.
  • Consider the legal plan - When you're getting married, it's a good idea to create a will and have access to other covered legal services.
  • Check into auto and home insurance - Maybe you're buying your first home to begin your married life. It's nice to know that home and auto insurance are available at group rates and with the convenience of payroll deductions through MetLife.
  • Take advantage of online shopping and travel discounts - As a couple, maybe you enjoy taking impromptu vacations. Or maybe you'd like to buy a big-screen TV online. Check out the discounts that may be available to you.
  • Health Advocate - With your busy schedules, if you are having trouble scheduling a medical or dental appointment, you can call Health Advocate to help you locate a participating doctor and schedule an appointment.

If you're planning on adding to your family soon, you probably have a lot on your mind. You will want to take advantage of all the valuable tools and resources that are available to you during your pregnancy. You will also want to ensure that your benefits are protecting your new little one.

Things to consider...

  • Healthy mom, healthy baby - The maternity program offered through the medical plan you are enrolled in, along with the other online wellness tools will provide valuable resources to help you with a healthy pregnancy and delivery.
  • Get reimbursed through the adoption assistance program - Adopting a child can be an expensive proposition. If you have been with First Data for at least 6 months, up to $10,000 of those expenses can be reimbursed for the legal adoption of a child.
  • Add your child to health benefits - Newborns require many medical visits during their first year. The medical plans, provided by First Data provide for 100% coverage for well-baby visits and immunizations. Within 90 days of the birth or adoption, go to Your Benefits Resources to enroll your baby in the medical plan and any other coverage options available. You do not need your newborn's SSN to enroll them in coverage, however, when you receive your newborn's SSN (must be within 12 months), provide this information to the Health and Life Help Desk so your dependent's record is up to date. See qualified family status change.
  • Contribute to your Health Savings Account (HSA) - If you're enrolled in the Standard or Enhanced medical plan, you can save money on taxes by contributing to an HSA. Your HSA funds can earn interest and carry over from year to year, there is no "use it or lose it". Adding a new member to the family can be expensive, so be sure you take advantage of saving taxes where you can.
  • Use the Day Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) - If you've compared costs for child care lately, you know it's not exactly cheap. But, if you enroll in the Day Care FSA, your contributions will come out of your pay before any taxes are calculated. This helps you reduce your taxes... which is like paying less for your dependent care.
  • Care$ Benefit - If you earn $40,000 or less per year, are a full-time employee and elect this benefit, First Data will contribute to your Day Care Flexible Spending Account to help you with your day care expenses while you are at work.
  • Call the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) if you need help - Changes in your family might cause some anxiety. The EAP is only a phone call away if you'd like to talk about it. The EAP can also help in other ways, such as directing you to quality child care in your area.
  • Don't smoke around the baby - Second-hand smoke is bad for everyone. Take care of your health by checking out the Tobacco Cessation program available for you and your spouse through Health Advocate.
  • Consider voluntary long-term disability coverage - You're much more likely to use the disability benefit than the life insurance benefit during your career. Make sure you can support your family if you are disabled due to an illness or injury and unable to come to work.
  • Health Advocate - Don't know what to expect at your doctor's appointments? Contact Health Advocate to help you prepare for your health care appointments both while you're expecting and for the pediatrician's visits.
  • Check your life insurance - Ask yourself "How much money will my family need after my death to meet immediate expenses, like funeral expenses and debts?" and "How much money will my family need to maintain their standard of living over the long run?" Based on those answers, make sure you select enough life insurance to address your family's needs.

You are, in a word, busy. Never a dull moment; there's always something going on between work and your family life. Make sure you take the time to review your benefits every year to ensure your coverage meets your family's current needs. It's important that you take care of your kids, and it's equally important that you take care of yourself. You want to fully enjoy your time with them. They really do grow up fast!

Things to consider...

  • Annually review medical coverage for the whole family - Your children are getting to the age that they will need more than just immunizations and well exams. They will also need back-to-school and sports physicals. Remember, preventive care services are covered at 100%. Your family also may need emergency medical care (like stitches, broken bones, etc.). Emergency room services are expensive; if your emergency occurs during regular business hours, call your doctor's office to arrange for treatment or find a nearby Urgent Care center. If your spouse/domestic partner is eligible for medical coverage through his/her employer, then he or she cannot participate in a First Data medical plan. Annually, compare your medical plan options available from First Data and your spouse's employer carefully to determine what plan makes the most sense for you and your family. Coverage through First Data may or may not be your best option.
  • If enrolled in First Data's medical plan, calculate the amount to put into your Health Savings Account (HSA) - with little ones you will undoubtedly have unexpected medical expenses. Contributing money and reaping the tax savings will allow you an emergency cash account to pay for those medical bills.
  • Choose dental coverage for cleanings and more - It's smart to plan on getting everyone's teeth cleaned at least twice a year. Your kids might be getting old enough to need braces, too, so check out how orthodontia is covered.
  • Save money with the Day Care Flexible Spending Account (DC FSA) - Even if your kids don't need full-time daycare, there may still be expenses for before- or after-school care. Most summer day camps are qualified expenses under the Day Care FSA, too. If you enroll in the Day Care FSA, your contributions will come out of your pay before any taxes are calculated. This helps you reduce your taxes...which is like paying less for your child care.
  • Care$ Benefit - If you have a Day Care FSA, don't miss out on the Care$ benefit. This is extra money First Data will contribute toward the DC FSA each year as long as you earn $40,000 or less per year, are a full-time employee and elect this benefit when you enroll.
  • Health Advocate - With growing children, you may find yourself at the doctor a lot more than you used to be. Take advantage of the Health Advocate phone service to help you find your way through the health care system. Help ranges from finding the right care all the way through to understanding the insurance company's Explanation of Benefits. Don't forget, Health Advocate can also help you with your dental needs as well.
  • The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) can help - Life is stressful with a growing family. Don't let stress keep you from enjoying life-the EAP is just a phone call away to help you with the challenges of a busy life.
  • Section 529 Savings Plan - Start saving for college now to give your money time to grow. With a 529 savings plan, you invest after-tax money, but all your earnings grow free from federal income taxes. From work, go to FirstWeb and click on Work Tools>Forms>Benefits.
  • Check your life insurance - Ask yourself "How much money will my family need after my death to meet immediate expenses, like funeral expenses and debts?" and "How much money will my family need to maintain their standard of living over the long run?" Based on those answers, make sure you select enough life insurance to address your family's needs.

How did the kids grow up so fast? It seems like they were just starting kindergarten and now they're off at college.

Things to consider...

  • Find network providers near the kids' schools - By accessing in-network providers, you pay less for their medical care. To find providers near their campuses, go to your plan's online provider directory. Also, the plan's Web site allows you to print a member ID card for their personal use at school.
  • Contribute to your Health Savings Account (HSA) - If you're enrolled in the Standard or Enhanced medical plan, you can save money on taxes by contributing to an HSA. Your HSA funds can earn interest and carry over from year to year, there is no "use it or lose it". As you get closer to retirement, the HSA is a great way to save for future medical expenses. If you are age 55 or older, you may be eligible to make an additional $1,000 "catch-up" contribution to your HSA to help save for retirement.
  • Save money with home and auto discounts - Money might be a little tight with a larger portion of your paycheck goingtoward tuition, books, room and board. MetLife may be able to save you money through its home and auto insurance group rates.
  • Discount program for outfitting the dorm room and buying cell phones and electronics - Most colleges now require students to have laptops, so you might as well pay less for it. Of course, you'll need a printer to go with it. And, cell phones are an integral part of everyday life, so it's great to have a way to pay less.
  • Express Script's mail-order drug program is convenient and cost efficient - If your dependent takes medications on a regular basis, it makes sense to have a 90-day supply sent straight to him/her at school. It saves you money, too.
  • Health Advocate - If your kids are in college and need to have medical records transferred, or you are looking for a participating facility, call Health Advocate for assistance.
  • Secure your future-Take advantage of First Data Wellness initiatives to help offset the cost of your medical premiums and help you live a healthier lifestyle.SimplyWell can help you achieve your health goals.
  • Check your life insurance - Ask yourself "How much money will my family need after my death to meet immediate expenses, like funeral expenses and debts?" and "How much money will my family need to maintain their standard of living over the long run?" Based on those answers, make sure you select enough life insurance to address your family's needs.

The kids have flown the coop, and now it's time to focus on yourself again. You still have time to accumulate more savings during these years before you retire. Be sure to take care of your health by getting regular checkups and preventive care screenings so you have the energy to do what you like to do.

Things to consider...

  • If your children no longer meet our eligibility definition, drop their benefits - Eligibility ends at the end of the month in which your child turns 26 for medical, dental and vision (up to age 19 or 23 for full-time students for child life insurance). Make sure you are not paying for coverage you are no longer eligible to participate in. Learn more about Qualified Family Status Changes.
  • Increase your HSA contributions - If you are enrolled in either the Enhanced or Standard Medical Plans, your unused HSA contributions will roll over from year to year. They can be used toward future medical expenses, including paying for retiree health care expenses. If you are 55 or older, you may be eligible to make an additional $1,000 "catch-up" contribution to your HSA to help save for retirement.
  • Consider reducing your Health Care FSA contributions - If you're no longer paying out of pocket for your kids' orthodontia, eye glasses and exams, make sure you exclude those amounts from your FSA contribution. Estimate conservatively since you will lose any Health Care FSA contributions you don't use.
  • Use the online wellness tools - We offer a wide array of valuable wellness tools to help you be the healthiest you can be. Take advantage of your medical plan's online health risk assessment, healthy living programs and personal health record.
  • Use the travel discounts - Enjoy this time to focus on yourself and take some trips you only dared to dream about-for less.
  • Health Advocate - If you need information or research regarding a complex medical condition you or a family member is dealing with, or you need to locate or arrange for home health care for a parent, call Health Advocate and talk to your Personal Health Advocate for answers.
  • Check your life insurance - Ask yourself "How much money will my family need after my death to meet immediate expenses, like funeral expenses and debts?" and "How much money will my family need to maintain their standard of living over the long run?" Based on those answers, make sure you select enough life insurance to address your family's needs.

 

 

You are on your own again, and this can be a tough transition. There are many things you need to think through to make sure you're on the right path. It's okay to be "self-centered" at this point. This is absolutely the time to take care of yourself and focus on what's right for you.

Things to consider...

  • Update your medical, dental, vision and life insurance options - You will want to drop your spouse from coverage. Make sure your coverage category is for you only or for you and your eligible dependent child(ren) only. You'll have only 31 days to make the change on the Your Benefits Resources enrollment site. Learn more about Qualified Family Status Changes.
  • Update your beneficiary information - Make sure you select a new beneficiary for your life insurance. Go to Your Benefits Resources and click on Health and Lifeand then Beneficiaries.
  • The EAP is here to help - You have suffered a loss, whether through divorce or death. The EAP can offer counseling to help you through the grief process.
  • Using the legal plan - If you are enrolled in the legal plan, this is a good time to use it to help you sort through all of the legal issues that have come up recently. Network attorneys can help with everything from changing your will to selling your home to other legal advice.
  • Long-term Disability - Your salary is more important than ever now that you are on your own. The money you spend on voluntary LTD insurance is money well spent. If you're not sure, ask yourself how long you could live on 50% of your income. Voluntary disability coverage would provide income protection up to66-2/3% of your salary.
  • Health Advocate - If you have a question regarding a medical and/or dental bill you recently received, or need help clarifying benefits because you are new to the plan or just have never used it, call Health Advocate.
  • Check your life insurance - Ask yourself "How much money will my family need after my death to meet immediate expenses, like funeral expenses and debts?" and "How much money will my family need to maintain their standard of living over the long run?" Based on those answers, make sure you select enough life insurance to address your family's needs.

Soon it will be time to do the things you've always wanted to do... travel the world, see your grandchildren, enjoy your hobbies. Make sure you have enough cash stashed away so you are comfortable. You will also want to make sure other areas of your financial life are in order.

Things to consider...

  • Start an HSA or increase your HSA contributions - The HSA, available in conjunction with the Enhanced or Standard Medical Plans, is a tax-free way to save for future health care expenses. Any unused HSA balance will roll forward into the next year so it's there when you need it. If you are 55 or older, you may be eligible to make an additional $1,000 "catch-up" contribution to your HSA to help save for retirement
  • Use the legal plan - The legal plan can help with anything from wills to identity theft. Take a look at the services offered by the plan and see if they would be helpful to you.
  • Express Scripts mail-order drug program - If you're taking prescription drugs for chronic conditions, the mail-order pharmacy can offer you convenience and cost savings. Express Scripts will even remind you when you need to reorder your prescriptions, so you don't run out.
  • Condition management program - If you have been diagnosed with high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease or another chronic medical condition, take advantage of your plan's condition management program. You'll receive support, educational materials, online tools and more.
  • Health Advocate - If you have questions regardingresources, medical terms, treatments, tests and medications, call Health Advocate and be connected with your own Personal Health Advocate.
  • Secure your future-Take advantage of First Data HealthyFirst Wellness initiatives to help offset the cost of your medical premiums and help you live a healthier lifestyle.SimplyWell can help you achieve your health goals
  • Check your life insurance - Ask yourself "How much money will my family need after my death to meet immediate expenses, like funeral expenses and debts?" and "How much money will my family need to maintain their standard of living over the long run?" Based on those answers, make sure you select enough life insurance to address your family's needs.